Report finds that more than half of workers feel ‘disconnected from their colleagues’

The finding comes as data shows lower-level employees feel impacts more

By Sean Devlin      
working from home, new normal concept. woman working with laptop computer on bed from her room during self isolation with stress emotion during transmission of COVID-19 Coronavirus pandemic

With the rise of remote work stemming from the start of the pandemic in 2020, it might not be terribly surprising to hear that lower-level employees feel somewhat disconnected from their co-workers and in particular, their senior leadership. According to a report by NovoEd, as many as 43% of employees on the lower rungs of the ladder share this feeling. While this lack of feeling of connectivity can be ascribed to a number of factors, including physical distance and issues that stem from it like Zoom burnout, it’s worth considering how to interpret this data from a workplace wellness standpoint.

Even when you’re working in a remote situation, it’s still possible to build a positive culture and foster connections between employees, no matter their physical locales. For example, setting up calls and meetings to just discuss how an employee is feeling about their role and not the specifics of their job performance can go a long way to this end. It’s really easy to feel isolated from your coworkers when they only exist through a laptop screen most of the time. Blocking off time to talk about how the work is affecting an employee’s mental standing is a great way to build positive connections and avoid feelings of being cut off from the rest of the company, particularly for new employees.

Additionally, over the last few years, chances to learn on the job have also taken a hit according to the report, with 31% of respondents stating that their organizations provide ample opportunities for upskilling and growth. The desire for growth is often a major priority for any employee, particularly those trying to climb the ladder of the company. If an organization wants to avoid the disconnect these respondents are concerned about, giving chances for advancement through continuing education and growth on the company ladder can be a big part of that. If we’re given the opportunity to become more skilled at our jobs by our employers, that’s something that can carry over into many parts of the organization, and not just within an employee’s job description.